Minggu, 02 Januari 2011

ScienceDaily Top Science Headlines

for Sunday, January 2, 2011

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Neandertals’ extinction not caused by deficient diets, tooth analysis shows (January 1, 2011) -- Researchers have discovered evidence to debunk the theory that Neandertals' disappearance was caused in part by a deficient diet -- one that lacked variety and was overly reliant on meat. After discovering starch granules from plant food trapped in the dental calculus on 40-thousand-year-old Neandertal teeth, the scientists believe that Neandertals ate a wide variety of plants and included cooked grains as part of a more sophisticated, diverse diet similar to early modern humans. ... > full story

Alzheimer's disease: Are plaques and tangles a symptom, not the cause? (January 1, 2011) -- One researcher thinks that the national research effort to understand Alzheimer's disease has gone about as far as it can go with its current theories. And that's not far enough. He thinks plaques and tangles are a symptom, not the cause. ... > full story

Budding research links climate change and earlier flowering plants (January 1, 2011) -- New research shows that global warming may be impacting the blooming cycle of plants. ... > full story

Esophageal cancer risk lower than expected for patients with GERD (January 1, 2011) -- The risk of esophageal cancer among patients who suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease is not as high as many may think, according to new research. ... > full story

Technique turns computer chip defects into an advantage (January 1, 2011) -- Physicists have discovered that tiny defects inside a computer chip can be used to tune the properties of key atoms in the chip. The technique involves rearranging the holes left by missing atoms to tune the properties of dopants -- the chemical impurities that give the semiconductors in computer chips their special properties. ... > full story

When the brain knows no fear: Fear discovery could lead to new interventions for PTSD (January 1, 2011) -- Researchers have pinpointed the part of the brain that causes people to experience fear -- a discovery that could improve treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety conditions. ... > full story

New genetic alterations associated with human height identified (January 1, 2011) -- New research identifies uncommon and previously unknown variants associated with height and might provide insight into the genetic architecture of other complex traits. ... > full story

Key protein discovered that allows nerve cells to repair themselves (January 1, 2011) -- An unexpected process that is required for regeneration after severe neuron injury has been discovered in the part of the neuron that receives information from other cells and from the outside world. The scientists hope that the discovery will provide insights for researchers who are developing drug therapies for patients with nerve disease or nerve damage. ... > full story

Scientists peer into the future of stem cell biology (January 1, 2011) -- Remarkable progress in understanding how stem cell biology works has been reported by a team of leading scientists. Stem cell biology is making waves around the world with great hope for the eventual repair of parts of the body. While many scientists see these breakthroughs as viable, there are hurdles that must be overcome, including the worrisome potential for introducing cancer when making a repair to an organ. ... > full story

Blood-thinning treatment standards changing for heart patients, new research shows (January 1, 2011) -- Researchers have found that warfarin, a known anticoagulation (blood-thinning) drug, may not be as beneficial to some patients with atrial fibrillation as previously thought. ... > full story

Cloud atlas: Scientist maps the meaning of mid-level clouds (January 1, 2011) -- Clouds play a major role in the climate-change equation, but they are the least-understood variable in the sky, observes a geoscientist, who says mid-level clouds are especially understudied. ... > full story

Study probes obesity link to fibromyalgia (January 1, 2011) -- Afflicting up to 5 percent of the U.S. population, mostly women, fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain and range of function problems. A new study reports there is close association between obesity and disability in fibromyalgia patients. ... > full story

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