Senin, 14 Februari 2011

ScienceDaily Technology Headlines

for Monday, February 14, 2011

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3-D movies on your cell phone (February 14, 2011) -- Researchers have combined the new mobile radio standard LTE-Advanced with a video coding technique. The technology promises to put 3-D movies on your cell phone. ... > full story

Deep interior of moon resembles Earth's core (February 13, 2011) -- The moon has long been studied to help us better understand our own planet. Of particular interest is the lunar interior, which could hold clues to its ancient origins. In an attempt to extract information on the very deep interior of the moon, researchers applied new technology to old data. Apollo seismic data was reanalyzed using modern methodologies and detected what many scientists have predicted: the moon has a core. ... > full story

Nanoparticles may enhance circulating tumor cell detection (February 12, 2011) -- Tiny gold particles can help doctors detect tumor cells circulating in the blood of patients with head and neck cancer, researchers have found. ... > full story

3-D digital dinosaur track download: A roadmap for saving at-risk natural history resources (February 12, 2011) -- Portable laser scanning technology allows researchers to tote a fossil discovery from field to lab in the form of digital data on a laptop. But standard formats to ensure data accessibility of these "digitypes" are needed, say paleontologists. They field-scanned a Texas dinosaur track, then back at the lab created an exact 3-D facsimile to scale. ... > full story

Superhalogens: New class of magic atomic clusters discovered (February 12, 2011) -- An international team of researchers has discovered a new class of magnetic superhalogens -- a class of atomic clusters able to exhibit unusual stability at a specific size and composition, which may be used to advance materials science by allowing scientists to create a new class of salts with magnetic and super-oxidizing properties not previously found. ... > full story

Scientists hope to cut years off development time of new antibiotics (February 12, 2011) -- Eliminating tens of thousands of manual lab experiments, researchers are working toward a method to cut the development time of new antibiotics. A computerized modeling system they're developing will speed up the often decade-long process. Pharmacy professors and engineering professors are focusing on dosing regimens to reveal which ones are most likely to be effective in combating infection and which are not worth pursuing. ... > full story

New view of family life in the North American nebula (February 11, 2011) -- Stars at all stages of development, from dusty little tots to young adults, are on display in a new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. This cosmic community is called the North American nebula. In visible light, the region resembles the North American continent, with the most striking resemblance being the Gulf of Mexico. But in Spitzer's infrared view, the continent disappears. Instead, a swirling landscape of dust and young stars comes into view. ... > full story

Making a point: Method prints nanostructures using hard, sharp 'pen' tips floating on soft polymer springs (February 11, 2011) -- Researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly prototyping nanoscale devices and structures that is so inexpensive the "print head" can be thrown away when done. Hard-tip, soft-spring lithography rolls into one method the best of scanning-probe lithography -- high resolution -- and the best of polymer pen lithography -- low cost and easy implementation. The new method could be used in the areas of electronics, medical diagnostics and pharmaceuticals, among others. ... > full story

LED products billed as eco-friendly contain toxic metals, study finds (February 11, 2011) -- Those light-emitting diodes marketed as safe, environmentally preferable alternatives to traditional light bulbs actually contain lead, arsenic and a dozen other potentially hazardous substances, according to new research. ... > full story

Metaknowledge: Powerful new ways to electronically mine research (February 11, 2011) -- The Internet has become not only a tool for disseminating knowledge through scientific publications, but it also has the potential to shape scientific research through expanding the field of metaknowledge -- the study of knowledge itself. The new possibilities for metaknowledge include developing a better understanding of science's social context and the biases that can affect research findings and choices of research topic. ... > full story

Exercise helps overweight children think better, do better in math (February 11, 2011) -- Regular exercise improves the ability of overweight, previously inactive children to think, plan and even do math, researchers report. They hope the findings in 171 overweight 7- to 11-year-olds -- all sedentary when the study started - gives educators the evidence they need to ensure that regular, vigorous physical activity is a part of every school day. ... > full story

Study of volcanoes in the outer solar system produces unexpected bonus for nanotechnology (February 11, 2011) -- Mysterious expanding ice crystals in the moons of Saturn and Neptune may be of interest to future developers of microelectronics. Neutron scattering has discovered that methanol crystals that may be found in outer solar system ‘ice lavas’ have unusual expansion properties. The unexpected finding by a planetary geologist will interest developers of ‘nano-switches’ – single atom thick valves used in ‘micro-electronics’ at the nano scale. ... > full story

How much information is there in the world? (February 11, 2011) -- Think you're overloaded with information? Not even close. A new study calculates how much information humankind can handle. ... > full story

New method for reporting solar data (February 11, 2011) -- A straightforward new way to calculate, compile, and graphically present solar radiation measurements in a format that is accessible to decision makers and the general public has been developed. ... > full story

Two-timing spacecraft has date with another comet (February 11, 2011) -- NASA's Stardust spacecraft, equipped with the University of Chicago's Dust Flux Monitor Instrument, is hurtling at more than 24,000 miles an hour toward a Valentine's Day encounter with comet Tempel 1. ... > full story

Robot therapy can improve arm, shoulder mobility after stroke (February 10, 2011) -- Robotic-assisted rehabilitation therapy, combined with standard rehabilitation, can improve upper extremity mobility in stroke patients with paralysis on one side. Patients with severe paralysis were more likely to be aided by robotic therapy. ... > full story

Revolutionary microchip technology? (February 10, 2011) -- Scientists have made the world’s first junctionless transistor even smaller. The transistor is the building block of the microchip. ... > full story

Engineers study hybrid systems to design robust unmanned vehicles (February 10, 2011) -- Aerospace and mechanical engineers are studying bird and bee flight to develop unmanned vehicles that stay aloft longer and cope with sudden and severe changes in airflow. ... > full story

Race against time to find Apollo 14's lost voyagers: 'Moon trees' (February 10, 2011) -- In communities all across the US, travelers that went to the moon and back with the Apollo 14 mission are living out their quiet lives. The voyagers in question are not astronauts. They're "moon trees." ... > full story

Paperweight for platinum: Bracing catalyst in material makes fuel cell component work better and last longer (February 10, 2011) -- A new combination of nanoparticles and graphene results in a more durable catalytic material for fuel cells, according to new research. The catalytic material is not only hardier but more chemically active as well. The researchers are confident the results will help improve fuel cell design. ... > full story

Nanonets give rust a boost as agent in water splitting's hydrogen harvest (February 10, 2011) -- Coating a lattice of tiny wires called Nanonets with iron oxide creates an economical and efficient platform for the process of water splitting -- an emerging clean fuel method that harvests hydrogen from water, researchers report. ... > full story

New method takes snapshots of proteins as they fold (February 10, 2011) -- Using a sophisticated version of the stroboscopic photography Eadweard Muybridge used to prove in 1877 that a horse takes all four hooves off the ground when it gallops, scientists have now caught proteins in the act of folding, a process that can take less than thousandths of a second. ... > full story

New solar cell self-repairs like natural plant systems (February 10, 2011) -- Researchers are creating a new type of solar cell designed to self-repair like natural photosynthetic systems in plants by using carbon nanotubes and DNA, an approach aimed at increasing service life and reducing cost. ... > full story

New technology in human trials to spot cardiac disease, cancer, drug abuse: Diagnostic chip may help hearts, cut costs (February 10, 2011) -- Heart disease is a silent killer, but new microchip technology is expected to advance the art of diagnosis. ... > full story

The 'new' kilogram is approaching (February 10, 2011) -- With the aid of a single crystal of highly enriched 28Si, the Avogadro constant has now been measured as exactly as never before. Within the scope of the redefinition of the kilogram, the value permits the currently most exact realization of this unit. ... > full story

Stardust-NExT: Heading into the bonus round -- in space (February 9, 2011) -- A bonus round is something one usually associates with the likes of a TV game show, not a pioneering deep space mission. "We are definitely in the bonus round," said Stardust-NExT Project Manager Tim Larson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "This spacecraft has already flown by an asteroid and a comet, returned comet dust samples to Earth, and now has almost doubled its originally planned mission life. Now it is poised to perform one more comet flyby." ... > full story

Microsponges from seaweed may save lives (February 9, 2011) -- Microsponges derived from seaweed may help diagnose heart disease, cancers, HIV and other diseases quickly and at far lower cost than current clinical methods. ... > full story

Girls' interest in computing science piqued by making video games (February 9, 2011) -- For high-school girls the fun is in making video games, not just playing them, according to a new study. Their study shows that if you want to get more females interested in computing science, you have to rewrite the program, so to speak. ... > full story

Hydrogels used to make precise new sensor (February 9, 2011) -- Researchers are developing a new type of biological and chemical sensor that has few moving parts, is low-cost and yet highly sensitive, sturdy and long-lasting. The "diffraction-based" sensors are made of thin stripes of a gelatinous material called a hydrogel. ... > full story

Greener process for key ingredient for everything from paint to diapers (February 9, 2011) -- Scientists are reporting discovery of an environmentally friendly way to make a key industrial material -- used in products ranging from paints to diapers -- from a renewable raw material without touching the traditional pricey and increasingly scarce petroleum-based starting material. ... > full story

World's first programmable nanoprocessor: Nanowire tiles can perform arithmetic and logical functions (February 9, 2011) -- Scientists have developed and demonstrated the world's first programmable nanoprocessor. The groundbreaking prototype computer system represents a significant step forward in the complexity of computer circuits that can be assembled from synthesized nanometer-scale components. ... > full story

Ultrafast quantum computer closer: Ten billion bits of entanglement achieved in silicon (February 9, 2011) -- Scientists have made a significant step towards an ultrafast quantum computer by successfully generating 10 billion bits of quantum entanglement in silicon for the first time -- entanglement is the key ingredient that promises to make quantum computers far more powerful than conventional computing devices. ... > full story

Neutron analysis reveals 'two doors down' superconductivity link (February 9, 2011) -- Neutron scattering analysis of two families of iron-based materials suggests that the magnetic interactions thought responsible for high-temperature superconductivity may lie "two doors down": the key magnetic exchange pairings occur in a next-nearest-neighbor ordering of atoms, rather than adjacent atoms. ... > full story

Successful operation of carbon nanotube-based integrated circuits manufactured on plastic substrates (February 9, 2011) -- Scientists have developed a simple and fast process to manufacture high-quality carbon nanotube-based thin film transistors (TFT) on a plastic substrate, enabling them to manufacture the world's first sequential logic circuits using carbon nanotubes. The technology could lead to the development of high-speed, roll-to-roll manufacturing processes to manufacture low-cost flexible devices such as electronic paper in the future. ... > full story

Jatropha: Green biodiesel from African tree (February 9, 2011) -- Jatropha has been championed as a major environmental opportunity for developing countries with a semi-arid climate and marginal soil. Scientists have been investigating whether this small, hardy and relatively pest-free tree lives up to its billing. ... > full story

Stardust NExT set to meet its second comet (February 9, 2011) -- It's been 12 years since Stardust was launched and seven years since it encountered a comet called Wild 2 out beyond Mars. Next Monday the probe will make history again when it meets its second comet, Tempel 1. ... > full story

Challenges for biofuels: New life cycle assessment report (February 9, 2011) -- A new report presents seven grand challenges for addressing the social, economic and environmental issues that must be confronted before advanced biofuels can replace gasoline on a widescale basis. ... > full story

Innovative iPhone app developed to carry out psychological and social research (February 9, 2011) -- An international team of researchers is developing a new way of conducting psychological and social research. Instead of bringing people into laboratories the team has launched an iPhone/iPad app that people can download for free in English, French and Dutch. ... > full story

Stardust celebrates 12 years with rocket burn (February 9, 2011) -- NASA's Stardust spacecraft marked its 12th anniversary in space on Monday, Feb. 7, with a rocket burn to further refine its path toward a Feb. 14 date with a comet. ... > full story

Generic drug may improve the effectiveness of cancer nanotherapies (February 8, 2011) -- Low doses of losartan, an FDA-approved generic hypertension medication, may improve the results of nanotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment by modifying the network of abnormal collagen fibers that characterizes most solid tumors. ... > full story

Tool makes search for Martian life easier: Red Planet a good fit for laser-ion funnel mass spectrometry (February 8, 2011) -- Newly developed ion funnel technology could make finding life on Mars's surface easier when coupled with a laser and a mass spectrometer that are placed directly on the robotic arm of a space rover. ... > full story

Fingerprint makes computer chips counterfeit-proof (February 8, 2011) -- Product counterfeiters are increasingly targeting computer chips and electronic components, with attacks on hardware modules becoming commonplace. Tailor-made security technology utilizes a component's individual material properties to generate a digital key. This provides components with an identity -- since their unique structure cannot be copied. ... > full story

Helping drivers cut fuel use (February 8, 2011) -- Ever wonder how much fuel you can save by avoiding stop-and-go traffic, closing your window, not using air conditioning or coasting toward stops? ... > full story

Conceptualizing cancer cells as ancient 'toolkit' (February 8, 2011) -- In a new paper, astrobiology researchers seek to explain why cancer cells deploy so many clever tricks in such a coherent and organized way. ... > full story

Researchers predict future of electronic devices, see top ten list of expected breakthroughs (February 8, 2011) -- In the first published critical review of technical developments related to electronic paper devices (i.e., e-readers like the Amazon Kindle), experts review the next generation of these devices. ... > full story

Bound neutrons pave way to free ones: Scientists extract information about internal structure of free neutrons (February 8, 2011) -- A study of bound protons and neutrons has allowed scientists, for the first time, to extract information through experimentation about the internal structure of free neutrons, without the assistance of a theoretical model. ... > full story

New technique controls sizes of nanoparticle clusters for environmental, health and safety studies (February 8, 2011) -- Researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method for producing nanoparticle clusters in a variety of controlled sizes that are stable over time. The technique can be used in studies on the environmental, health and safety impacts of nanoparticle clusters. ... > full story

Atom-thick sheets unlock future technologies (February 8, 2011) -- A new way of splitting layered materials, similar to graphite, into sheets of material just one atom thick could lead to revolutionary new electronic and energy storage technologies. ... > full story

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