Sabtu, 12 Februari 2011

ScienceDaily Environment Headlines

for Saturday, February 12, 2011

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New way to attack pathogens: RNA recycling system gone awry brings MRSA to a halt (February 11, 2011) -- Scientists have discovered a new way to attack dangerous pathogens, marking a hopeful next step in the ever-escalating battle between man and microbe. By stopping bacteria's ability to degrade RNA -- a "housekeeping" process crucial to their ability to thrive -- scientists were able to stop methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA both in the laboratory and in infected mice. The approach shows promise against the most severe strains of the bacteria as well as MRSA biofilms. ... > full story

Livestock boom risks aggravating animal 'plagues,' poses threat to food security and world's poor (February 11, 2011) -- Increasing numbers of domestic livestock and more resource-intensive production methods are encouraging animal epidemics around the world, a problem that is particularly acute in developing countries, where livestock diseases present a growing threat to the food security of already vulnerable populations, according to new assessments. ... > full story

Quest for extinct giant rats leads scientists to ancient face carvings (February 11, 2011) -- Ancient stone faces carved into the walls of a well-known limestone cave in East Timor have been discovered by a team searching for fossils of extinct giant rats. ... > full story

Identifying large hurricanes through seismology (February 11, 2011) -- Storm-generated seismic signals may allow seismologists to detect large hurricanes at sea and track their intensity, adding useful data to the discussion of whether anthropogenic global warming has increased the frequency and intensity of hurricanes and tropical storms, including ones that don't reach land. ... > full story

New view of human evolution? 3.2 million-year-old fossil foot bone supports humanlike bipedalism in Lucy's species (February 11, 2011) -- A fossilized foot bone recovered from Hadar, Ethiopia, shows that by 3.2 million years ago human ancestors walked bipedally with a modern human-like foot. These findings support the hypothesis that A. afarensis was primarily an upright walker, as opposed to a more versatile creature that also moved through the trees. ... > full story

New hybrid drug, derived from common spice, may protect, rebuild brain cells after stroke (February 11, 2011) -- Whether or not you're fond of Indian, Southeast Asian and Middle Eastern food, stroke researchers think you may become a fan of one of their key spices. The scientists created a new molecule from curcumin, a chemical component of the golden-colored spice turmeric, and found in laboratory experiments that it affects mechanisms that protect and help regenerate brain cells after stroke. ... > full story

LED products billed as eco-friendly contain toxic metals, study finds (February 11, 2011) -- Those light-emitting diodes marketed as safe, environmentally preferable alternatives to traditional light bulbs actually contain lead, arsenic and a dozen other potentially hazardous substances, according to new research. ... > full story

Virus, parasite may combine to increase harm to humans (February 11, 2011) -- A parasite and a virus may be teaming up in a way that increases the parasite's ability to harm humans, scientists have discovered. When the parasite Leishmania infects a human, immune system cells known as macrophages respond. However, some Leishmania strains are infected with a virus that can trigger a severe response in macrophages, allowing the parasite to do more harm in animal infections. ... > full story

Biologists unlock chemical clues to courtship in swordtail fish urine (February 11, 2011) -- When you've got to go, you've got to go -- upstream, that is, if you are a male swordtail fish seeking a mate, according to new research. ... > full story

Newly discovered squid pheromone sparks extreme aggression on contact (February 11, 2011) -- Scientists have identified a pheromone produced by female squid that triggers immediate and dramatic fighting in male squid that come into contact with it. The aggression-producing pheromone, believed to be the first of its kind discovered in any marine animal, belongs to a family of proteins found in vertebrates, including humans. ... > full story

Circulating blood antibodies are not required for HIV protection, study suggests (February 11, 2011) -- A vaccine which stimulates production of specific anti-HIV antibodies in the vaginal tissue was sufficient to protect monkeys from exposure to live virus, according to a new study. The results may also help to explain why a few individuals who lack anti-HIV antibodies in the blood are able to resist infection, even when they are repeatedly exposed to HIV. ... > full story

Pollution controls used during China Olympics could save lives if continued, study concludes (February 11, 2011) -- The air pollution control measures that were put in place in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games -- if continued -- would cut almost in half the lifetime risk of lung cancer for the area's residents from certain inhaled pollutants, a new study concludes. ... > full story

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